Celestica Announces Fourth Quarter and Fiscal Year 2014 Financial Results


Celestica Announces Fourth Quarter and Fiscal Year 2014 Financial Results

January 20, 2015

(All amounts in U.S. dollars.
Per share information based on diluted
shares outstanding unless otherwise noted.)

TORONTO, Jan. 20, 2015 /PRNewswire/ - Celestica Inc. (NYSE, TSX: CLS), a global leader in the delivery of end-to-end product lifecycle solutions, today announced financial results for the fourth quarter and fiscal year ended December 31, 2014.

Fourth Quarter 2014 Highlights

  • Revenue: $1.424 billion, at the midpoint of our guidance range of $1.375 billion to $1.475 billion (announced October 21, 2014), relatively flat compared to the fourth quarter of 2013
  • Revenue from our diversified end market represented 27% of total revenue, flat compared to the fourth quarter of 2013
  • Operating margin (non-IFRS): 3.6%, compared to 3.3% for the fourth quarter of 2013
  • IFRS EPS: loss of $0.03 per share, including a non-cash goodwill impairment charge of $0.23 per share ($40.8 million) relating to our semiconductor business, compared to earnings of $0.12 per share for the fourth quarter of 2013
  • Adjusted EPS (non-IFRS): $0.23 per share (including a $0.02 per share income tax expense resulting from foreign exchange fluctuations), within the range of our guidance of $0.21 to $0.27 per share (announced October 21, 2014), compared to $0.24 per share for the fourth quarter of 2013
  • ROIC (non-IFRS): 20.8%, compared to 19.2% for the fourth quarter of 2013
  • Free cash flow (non-IFRS): $60.0 million, compared to $23.7 million for the fourth quarter of 2013
  • Recorded a non-cash goodwill impairment charge of $40.8 million
  • Repurchased and cancelled 2.2 million subordinate voting shares for $23.6 million under our current Normal Course Issuer Bid (NCIB), and launched a $50.0 million pre-funded program share repurchase thereunder

Fiscal Year 2014 Highlights

  • Revenue: $5.6 billion, decreased 3% compared to 2013
  • Revenue from our diversified end market grew 7% from 2013 to represent 28% of total revenue, up from 25% of total revenue for 2013
  • Operating margin (non-IFRS): 3.5%, compared to 3.0% for 2013
  • IFRS EPS: $0.60 per share, compared to $0.64 per share for 2013
  • Adjusted EPS (non-IFRS): $1.00 per share, compared to $0.83 per share for 2013
  • ROIC (non-IFRS): 19.5%, compared to 17.9% for 2013
  • Free cash flow (non-IFRS): $177.4 million, compared to $98.1 million for 2013
  • Repurchased and cancelled an aggregate of 8.5 million subordinate voting shares for $90.6 million under our current and previous NCIBs

"Celestica delivered solid operating results in the fourth quarter and throughout 2014, despite a business environment that continued to be challenging in our end markets.  In 2014, we successfully rationalized our business portfolio and increased productivity across our network achieving year-over-year growth in operating earnings, return on invested capital and free cash flow, while continuing to return value to our shareholders through share repurchases." said Craig Muhlhauser, Celestica's President and Chief Executive Officer.

"While we are clearly disappointed with the impairment of goodwill related to the acquisitions in our semiconductor business, we continue to believe in the potential of the business, make steady progress and win new programs across a number of customers in this sector."

"We remain focused on driving revenue growth, operational excellence and financial improvements across the business and look forward to the opportunities in front of us to deliver differentiated solutions to our customers and to generate value for our shareholders."

Fourth Quarter and Fiscal Year 2014 Summary



Three months ended

December 31


Year ended

December 31


2013



2014



2013



2014


Revenue (in millions).............................................................................

$

1,436.7



$

1,424.3



$

5,796.1



$

5,631.3














IFRS net earnings (loss) (in millions)(i)..............................................

$

22.1



$

(4.4)



$

118.0



$

108.2


IFRS earnings (loss) per share (i).......................................................

$

0.12



$

(0.03)



$

0.64



$

0.60














Adjusted net earnings (non-IFRS) (in millions)(ii).............................

$

44.4



$

40.3



$

154.5



$

179.5


Adjusted EPS (non-IFRS)(ii)..................................................................

$

0.24



$

0.23



$

0.83



$

1.00


Non-IFRS return on invested capital (ROIC)(ii)..................................

19.2

%


20.8

%


17.9

%


19.5

%

Non-IFRS operating margin(ii)..............................................................

3.3

%


3.6

%


3.0

%


3.5

%



i.    

International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) net loss for the fourth quarter of 2014 and net earnings for fiscal year 2014 included a non-cash goodwill impairment charge of $40.8 million, or $0.23 per share, related to our semiconductor business. Our IFRS net loss for the fourth quarter of 2014 also included an aggregate charge of $0.04 (pre-tax) per share for employee stock-based compensation expense and amortization of intangible assets (excluding computer software). This aggregate charge is within the range we provided on October 21, 2014 of an aggregate charge of between $0.03 and $0.07 per share for these items (see the tables in Schedule 1 attached hereto for per-item charges). Included in the fourth quarter of 2014 adjusted EPS (non-IFRS) of $0.23 was an income tax expense of $0.02 per share resulting from foreign exchange fluctuations in the quarter. 



ii.   

Non-IFRS measures do not have any standardized meaning prescribed by IFRS and therefore may not be comparable to similar measures presented by other public companies that use IFRS or other generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP). See "Non-IFRS Supplementary Information" below for information on our rationale for the use of non-IFRS measures, and Schedule 1 for, among other items, non-IFRS measures included in this press release, as well as their definitions, uses, and a reconciliation of non-IFRS to IFRS measures (where a comparable IFRS measure exists).

End Markets by Quarter as a Percentage of Total Revenue


2013


2014


Q1


Q2


Q3


Q4


FY


Q1


Q2


Q3


Q4


FY

Communications........................

40%


42%


45%


41%


42%


40%


40%


40%


40%


40%

Consumer..................................

7%


7%


6%


6%


6%


6%


5%


5%


3%


5%

Diversified(i)...............................

24%


25%


26%


27%


25%


28%


28%


29%


27%


28%

Servers.....................................

16%


14%


9%


11%


13%


10%


10%


9%


10%


9%

Storage......................................

13%


12%


14%


15%


14%


16%


17%


17%


20%


18%

Revenue (in billions)..................

$1.37


$1.50


$1.49


$1.44


$5.80


$1.31


$1.47


$1.42


$1.42


$5.63



i.  

 Our diversified end market is comprised of industrial, aerospace and defense, healthcare, solar, green technology, semiconductor equipment and other.

First Quarter 2015 Outlook

For the first quarter ending March 31, 2015, we anticipate revenue to be in the range of $1.275 to $1.375 billion, and non-IFRS adjusted net earnings per share to be in the range of $0.18 to $0.24. We expect a negative $0.04 to $0.08 per share (pre-tax) aggregate impact on net earnings on an IFRS basis for employee stock-based compensation expense and amortization of intangible assets (excluding computer software).

Fourth Quarter 2014 Webcast

Management will host its fourth quarter results conference call today at 4:30 p.m. Eastern Standard Time. The webcast can be accessed at www.celestica.com.

Non-IFRS Supplementary Information

In addition to disclosing detailed operating results in accordance with IFRS, Celestica provides supplementary non-IFRS measures to consider in evaluating the company's operating performance. Management uses adjusted net earnings and other non-IFRS measures to assess operating performance and the effective use and allocation of resources; to provide more meaningful period-to-period comparisons of operating results; to enhance investors' understanding of the core operating results of Celestica's business; and to set management incentive targets. We believe investors use both IFRS and non-IFRS measures to assess past, current and future decisions associated with our priorities and our allocation of capital, as well as to analyze how our business operates in, or responds to, swings in economic cycles or to other events that impact our core operations. See Schedule 1 - Supplementary Non-IFRS Measures for, among other items, non-IFRS measures provided herein, non-IFRS definitions, and a reconciliation of non-IFRS to IFRS measures (where a comparable IFRS measure exists).

About Celestica

Celestica is dedicated to delivering end-to-end product lifecycle solutions to drive our customers' success. Through our simplified global operations network and information technology platform, we are solid partners who deliver informed, flexible solutions that enable our customers to succeed in the markets they serve. Committed to providing a truly differentiated customer experience, our agile and adaptive employees share a proud history of demonstrated expertise and creativity that provides our customers with the ability to overcome complex challenges. For further information about Celestica, visit our website at www.celestica.com. Our securities filings can also be accessed at www.sedar.com and www.sec.gov.

Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-looking Statements

This news release contains forward-looking statements related to our future growth; trends in the electronics manufacturing services (EMS) industry; our financial or operational results including our quarterly revenue and earnings guidance; the impact of acquisitions and program wins or losses on our financial results and working capital requirements; anticipated expenses, charges, capital expenditures and/or benefits; our expected tax and litigation outcomes; our cash flows, financial targets and priorities; changes in our mix of revenue by end market; our ability to diversify and grow our customer base and develop new capabilities; the effect of the global economic environment on customer demand; and the number of subordinate voting shares and price thereof we may repurchase under our NCIB. Such forward-looking statements may, without limitation, be preceded by, followed by, or include words such as "believes", "expects", "anticipates", "estimates", "intends", "plans", "continues", "project", "potential", "possible", "contemplate", "seek", or similar expressions, or may employ such future or conditional verbs as "may", "might", "will", "could", "should" or "would", or may otherwise be indicated as forward-looking statements by grammatical construction, phrasing or context.  For those statements, we claim the protection of the safe harbor for forward-looking statements contained in the U.S. Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 and applicable Canadian securities laws.

Forward-looking statements are provided for the purpose of assisting readers in understanding management's current expectations and plans relating to the future. Readers are cautioned that such information may not be appropriate for other purposes. Forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and are subject to risks that could cause actual results to differ materially from conclusions, forecasts or projections expressed in such statements, including, among others, risks related to: our customers' ability to compete and succeed in the marketplace with the products we manufacture; price and other competitive factors generally affecting the EMS industry; managing our operations and our working capital performance during uncertain economic conditions; responding to rapid changes in demand and changes in our customers' outsourcing strategies, including the insourcing of programs; customer concentration and the challenges of diversifying our customer base and replacing revenue from lost programs or customer disengagements; changing commodity, material and component costs, as well as labor costs and conditions; disruptions to our operations, or those of our customers, component suppliers or logistics partners, including as a result of global or local events outside our control; retaining or expanding our business due to execution problems relating to the ramping of new programs; current or future litigation and/or governmental actions; successfully resolving commercial and operational challenges, and improving financial results, in our semiconductor business; delays in the delivery and availability of components, services and materials; non-performance by counterparties; our financial exposure to foreign currency volatility; our dependence on industries affected by rapid technological change; variability of operating results; managing our global operations and supply chain; increasing income taxes, tax audits, and defending our tax positions or meeting the conditions of tax incentives and credits; completing any restructuring actions and integrating any acquisitions; computer viruses, malware, hacking attempts or outages that may disrupt our operations; any failure to adequately protect our intellectual property or the intellectual property of others; any U.S. government shutdown or delay in the increase of the U.S. government debt ceiling; and compliance with applicable laws, regulations and social responsibility initiatives. These and other material risks and uncertainties are discussed in our public filings at www.sedar.com and www.sec.gov, including in our MD&A, our Annual Report on Form 20-F and subsequent reports on Form 6-K filed with or furnished to (as applicable) the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, and our Annual Information Form filed with the Canadian Securities Administrators.

Our revenue, earnings and other financial guidance, as contained in this press release, are based on various assumptions, many of which involve factors that are beyond our control. The material assumptions include those related to the following: production schedules from our customers, which generally range from 30 to 90 days and can fluctuate significantly in terms of volume and mix of products or services; the timing and execution of, and investments associated with, ramping new business; the success in the marketplace of our customers' products; the stability of general economic and market conditions, currency exchange rates, and interest rates; our pricing, the competitive environment and contract terms and conditions; supplier performance, pricing and terms; compliance by third parties with their contractual obligations, the accuracy of their representations and warranties, and the performance of their covenants; components, materials, services, plant and capital equipment, labor, energy and transportation costs and availability; operational and financial matters including the extent, timing and costs of replacing revenue from lost programs or customer disengagements; technological developments; overall demand improvement in the semiconductor industry, revenue growth and improved financial results in our semiconductor business; the timing and execution of any restructuring actions; and our ability to diversify our customer base and develop new capabilities. While management believes these assumptions to be reasonable under the current circumstances, they may prove to be inaccurate. Except as required by applicable law, we disclaim any intention or obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

All forward-looking statements attributable to us are expressly qualified by these cautionary statements.

Schedule 1

Supplementary Non-IFRS Measures

Our non-IFRS measures herein include adjusted gross profit, adjusted gross margin (adjusted gross profit as a percentage of revenue), adjusted selling, general and administrative expenses (SG&A), adjusted SG&A as a percentage of revenue, operating earnings (adjusted EBIAT), operating margin (adjusted EBIAT as a percentage of revenue), adjusted net earnings, adjusted net earnings per share, net invested capital, return on invested capital (ROIC), and free cash flow. Adjusted EBIAT, net invested capital, ROIC and free cash flow are further described in the tables below. In calculating these non-IFRS financial measures, management excludes the following items, as applicable: employee stock-based compensation expense, amortization of intangible assets (excluding computer software), restructuring and other charges, net of recoveries (most significantly restructuring charges), the write-down of goodwill, intangible assets and property, plant and equipment, and gains or losses related to the repurchase of shares or debt, net of tax adjustments and significant deferred tax write-offs or recoveries associated with restructuring actions or restructured sites.

We believe the non-IFRS measures we present herein are useful, as they enable investors to evaluate and compare our results from operations and cash resources generated from our business in a more consistent manner (by excluding specific items that we do not consider to be reflective of our ongoing operating results) and provide an analysis of operating results using the same measures our chief operating decision makers use to measure performance. The non-IFRS financial measures that can be reconciled to IFRS measures result largely from management's determination that the facts and circumstances surrounding the excluded charges or recoveries are not indicative of the ordinary course of our ongoing operation of our business.

Non-IFRS measures do not have any standardized meaning prescribed by IFRS and may not be comparable to similar measures presented by other public companies that use IFRS, or who report under U.S. GAAP and use non-U.S. GAAP measures to describe similar operating metrics. Non-IFRS measures are not measures of performance under IFRS and should not be considered in isolation or as a substitute for any standardized measure under IFRS. The most significant limitation to management's use of non-IFRS financial measures is that the charges or credits excluded from the non-IFRS measures are nonetheless charges or credits that are recognized under IFRS and that have an economic impact on the company. Management compensates for these limitations primarily by issuing IFRS results to show a complete picture of the company's performance, and reconciling non-IFRS results back to IFRS results where a comparable IFRS measure exists.

The economic substance of these exclusions and management's rationale for excluding these from non-IFRS financial measures is provided below:

Employee stock-based compensation expense, which represents the estimated fair value of stock options, restricted share units and performance share units granted to employees, is excluded because grant activities vary significantly from quarter-to-quarter in both quantity and fair value. In addition, excluding this expense allows us to better compare core operating results with those of our competitors who also generally exclude employee stock-based compensation expense from their core operating results, who may have different granting patterns and types of equity awards, and who may use different valuation assumptions than we do, including those competitors who use U.S. GAAP and non-U.S. GAAP measures to present similar metrics.

Amortization charges (excluding computer software) consist of non-cash charges against intangible assets that are impacted by the timing and magnitude of acquired businesses. Amortization of intangible assets varies among our competitors, and we believe that excluding these charges permits a better comparison of core operating results with those of our competitors who also generally exclude amortization charges.

Restructuring and other charges, net of recoveries, include costs relating to employee severance, lease terminations, facility closings and consolidations, write-downs of owned property and equipment which are no longer used and are available for sale, reductions in infrastructure and acquisition-related transaction costs. We exclude restructuring and other charges, net of recoveries, because we believe that they are not directly related to ongoing operating results and do not reflect expected future operating expenses after completion of these activities.  We believe these exclusions permit a better comparison of our core operating results with those of our competitors who also generally exclude these charges, net of recoveries, in assessing operating performance.

Impairment charges, which consist of non-cash charges against goodwill, intangible assets and property, plant and equipment, result primarily when the carrying value of these assets exceeds their recoverable amount. Our competitors may record impairment charges at different times. We believe that excluding these charges permits a better comparison of our core operating results with those of our competitors who also generally exclude these charges in assessing operating performance.

Gains or losses related to the repurchase of shares or debt are excluded as these gains or losses do not impact core operating performance and vary significantly among those of our competitors who also generally exclude these charges or recoveries in assessing operating performance.

Significant deferred tax write-offs or recoveries associated with restructuring actions or restructured sites are excluded as these write-offs or recoveries do not impact core operating performance and vary significantly among those of our competitors who also generally exclude these charges or recoveries in assessing operating performance.

The following table sets forth, for the periods indicated, the various non-IFRS measures discussed above, and a reconciliation of IFRS to non-IFRS measures, where a comparable IFRS measure exists (in millions, except percentages and per share amounts):


Three months ended December 31


Year ended December 31


2013


2014


2013


2014




% of revenue




% of revenue




% of revenue




% of revenue

IFRS Revenue............................................................

$

1,436.7




$

1,424.3




$

5,796.1




$

5,631.3



















IFRS gross profit......................................................

$

103.6


7.2%


$

104.5


7.3%


$

389.5


6.7%


$

405.4


7.2%

Employee stock-based compensation expense........

3.1




3.0




12.5




13.4



Non-IFRS adjusted gross profit.............................

$

106.7


7.4%


$

107.5


7.5%


$

402.0


6.9%


$

418.8


7.4%

















IFRS SG&A..................................................................

$

56.2


3.9%


$

52.9


3.7%


$

222.3


3.8%


$

210.3


3.7%

Employee stock-based compensation expense........

(3.5)




(2.9)




(16.7)




(15.0)



Non-IFRS adjusted SG&A.........................................

$

52.7


3.7%


$

50.0


3.5%


$

205.6


3.5%


$

195.3


3.5%

















IFRS earnings before income taxes.....................

$

20.8




$

5.7




$

130.7




$

124.6



Finance costs............................................................

0.8




1.0




2.9




3.1



Employee stock-based compensation expense........

6.6




5.9




29.2




28.4



Amortization of intangible assets (excluding computer software)..................................................

1.6




1.5




6.5




6.3



Impairment, restructuring and other charges............

17.5




37.4




4.0




37.1



Non-IFRS operating earnings (adjusted EBIAT) (1)..................................................................

$

47.3


3.3%


$

51.5


3.6%


$

173.3


3.0%


$

199.5


3.5%

















IFRS net earnings (loss).........................................

$

22.1


1.5%


$

(4.4)


(0.3)%


$

118.0


2.0%


$

108.2


1.9%

Employee stock-based compensation expense........

6.6




5.9




29.2




28.4



Amortization of intangible assets (excluding computer software)..................................................

1.6




1.5




6.5




6.3



Impairment, restructuring and other charges............

17.5




37.4




4.0




37.1



Adjustments for taxes (2).........................................

(3.4)




(0.1)




(3.2)




(0.5)



Non-IFRS adjusted net earnings............................

$

44.4




$

40.3




$

154.5




$

179.5



















Diluted EPS
















Weighted average # of shares (in millions) used for IFRS earnings (loss) per share.................................

184.5




175.6




185.4




180.4



IFRS earnings (loss) per share.................................

$

0.12




$

(0.03)




$

0.64




$

0.60



Weighted average # of shares (in millions) used for non-IFRS adjusted earnings per share*...................

184.5




177.6




185.4




180.4



Non-IFRS adjusted net earnings per share...............

$

0.24




$

0.23




$

0.83




$

1.00



# of shares outstanding at period end (in millions)......

181.0




174.6




181.0




174.6



















IFRS cash provided by operations........................

$

34.1




$

78.0




$

149.4




$

241.5



Purchase of property, plant and equipment, net of sales proceeds.........................................................

(9.8)




(15.8)




(48.6)




(59.9)



Finance costs paid....................................................

(0.6)




(2.2)




(2.7)




(4.2)



Non-IFRS free cash flow (3)....................................

$

23.7




$

60.0




$

98.1




$

177.4



















Non-IFRS ROIC % (4)..................................................

19.2

%



20.8

%



17.9

%



19.5

%


 

*      

Non-IFRS adjusted net earnings per share is calculated by dividing non-IFRS adjusted net earnings by the number of diluted weighted average shares outstanding. Because we reported a net loss on an IFRS basis in the fourth quarter of 2014, the calculation of IFRS diluted weighted average shares outstanding for such period excludes 2.0 million shares underlying in-the-money stock-based awards, as the effect of these shares would be anti-dilutive. We included the dilutive effects of these shares in the calculation of the weighted average number of shares outstanding used to calculate non-IFRS adjusted net earnings (per diluted share) for the fourth quarter of 2014, because their effects are dilutive in relation to this measure. 



(1)

 Management uses non-IFRS adjusted EBIAT as a measure to assess our operational performance related to our core operations. Non-IFRS adjusted EBIAT is defined as earnings before finance costs (consisting of interest and fees related to our credit facilities and accounts receivable sales program), amortization of intangible assets (excluding computer software) and income taxes. Non-IFRS adjusted EBIAT also excludes, in periods where such charges have been recorded, employee stock-based compensation expense, restructuring and other charges (net of recoveries), gains or losses related to the repurchase of shares or debt, and impairment charges.



(2)

The adjustments for taxes, as applicable, represent the tax effects on the non-IFRS adjustments and significant deferred tax write-offs or recoveries associated with restructuring actions or restructured sites that we believe do not impact our core operating performance.



(3)

 Management uses non-IFRS free cash flow as a measure, in addition to IFRS cash flow from operations, to assess our operational cash flow performance. We believe non-IFRS free cash flow provides another level of transparency to our liquidity. Non-IFRS free cash flow is defined as cash provided by or used in operating activities after the purchase of property, plant and equipment (net of proceeds from sale of certain surplus equipment and property) and finance costs paid.



(4)

Management uses non-IFRS ROIC as a measure to assess the effectiveness of the invested capital we use to build products or provide services to our customers. Our non-IFRS ROIC measure includes non-IFRS operating earnings, working capital management and asset utilization. Non-IFRS ROIC is calculated by dividing non-IFRS adjusted EBIAT by average non-IFRS net invested capital. Net invested capital (calculated in the table below) is a non-IFRS measure and consists of the following IFRS measures: total assets less cash, accounts payable, accrued and other current liabilities and provisions, and income taxes payable. We use a two-point average to calculate average non-IFRS net invested capital for the quarter and a five-point average to calculate average non-IFRS net invested capital for the year. There is no comparable measure under IFRS.

The following table sets forth, for the periods indicated, our calculation of non-IFRS ROIC % (in millions, except ROIC %):

 





Three months ended December 31


Year ended December 31





2013


2014


2013


2014

Non-IFRS operating earnings (adjusted EBIAT)...........................................

$

47.3



$

51.5



$

173.3



$

199.5


Multiplier.......................................................................................................

4



4



1



1


Annualized non-IFRS adjusted EBIAT..........................................................

$

189.2



$

206.0



$

173.3



$

199.5

















Average non-IFRS net invested capital for the period................................

$

987.8



$

990.4



$

968.7



$

1,021.8

















Non-IFRS ROIC % (1)..................................................................................

19.2

%


20.8

%


17.9

%


19.5

%





























December 31
 2013


March 31
 2014


June 30
 2014


September 30
 2014


December 31
 2014

Non-IFRS net invested capital consists of:















Total assets......................................................................

$

2,638.9



$

2,590.7



$

2,673.3



$

2,666.3



$

2,583.6


Less: cash.......................................................................

544.3



489.2



519.1



578.2



565.0


Less: accounts payable, accrued and other current liabilities, provisions and income taxes payable......

1,109.2



1,035.7



1,077.2



1,071.7



1,054.3


Non-IFRS net invested capital at period end (1)..............

$

985.4



$

1,065.8



$

1,077.0



$

1,016.4



$

964.3


















December 31
 2012


March 31
 2013


June 30
 2013


September 30
 2013


December 31
 2013

Non-IFRS net invested capital consists of:















Total assets......................................................................

$

2,658.8



$

2,643.4



$

2,705.5



$

2,714.4



$

2,638.9


Less: cash.......................................................................

550.5



531.3



553.5



546.8



544.3


Less: accounts payable, accrued and other current liabilities, provisions and income taxes payable......

1,143.9



1,145.7



1,214.8



1,177.5



1,109.2


Non-IFRS net invested capital at period end (1)..............

$

964.4



$

966.4



$

937.2



$

990.1



$

985.4


 

(1)

 Management uses non-IFRS ROIC as a measure to assess the effectiveness of the invested capital we use to build products or provide services to our customers. Our non-IFRS ROIC measure includes non-IFRS operating earnings, working capital management and asset utilization. Non-IFRS ROIC is calculated by dividing non-IFRS adjusted EBIAT by average non-IFRS net invested capital. Net invested capital is a non-IFRS measure and consists of the following IFRS measures: total assets less cash, accounts payable, accrued and other current liabilities and provisions, and income taxes payable. We use a two-point average to calculate average non-IFRS net invested capital for the quarter and a five-point average to calculate average non-IFRS net invested capital for the year. There is no comparable measure under IFRS.

GUIDANCE SUMMARY



Q4 2014 Guidance


Q4 2014 Actual


Q1 2015 Guidance (1)

IFRS revenue (in billions)...................................................................

$1.375 to $1.475


$1.424


$1.275 to $1.375

Non-IFRS adjusted EPS (diluted).....................................................

$0.21 to $0.27


$0.23


$0.18 to $0.24



(1)

 We expect a negative $0.04 to $0.08 per share (pre-tax) aggregate impact on net earnings on an IFRS basis for employee stock-based compensation expense and amortization of intangible assets (excluding computer software).



CELESTICA INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET
(in millions of U.S. dollars)
(unaudited)

 


December 31
 2013


December 31
 2014

Assets






Current assets:






Cash and cash equivalents (note 11)......................................................................................................

$

544.3



$

565.0


Accounts receivable (note 4)..................................................................................................................

654.1



693.5


Inventories (note 5)................................................................................................................................

817.2



719.0


Income taxes receivable..........................................................................................................................

13.6



11.4


Assets classified as held-for-sale...........................................................................................................

30.2



28.3


Other current assets...............................................................................................................................

61.1



87.0


Total current assets.....................................................................................................................................

2,120.5



2,104.2








Property, plant and equipment...................................................................................................................

313.6



312.4


Goodwill (note 9(b))...................................................................................................................................

60.3



19.5


Intangible assets..........................................................................................................................................

44.2



35.2


Deferred income taxes.................................................................................................................................

45.3



37.3


Other non-current assets (notes 8 and 9(c))...............................................................................................

55.0



75.0


Total assets.................................................................................................................................................

$

2,638.9



$

2,583.6








Liabilities and Equity






Current liabilities:






Accounts payable..................................................................................................................................

$

770.7



$

730.9


Accrued and other current liabilities......................................................................................................

274.5



259.6


Income taxes payable.............................................................................................................................

30.6



14.5


Current portion of provisions................................................................................................................

33.4



49.3


Total current liabilities................................................................................................................................

1,109.2



1,054.3








Pension and non-pension post-employment benefit obligations (note 8)..................................................

93.5



99.2


Provisions and other non-current liabilities................................................................................................

16.3



18.1


Deferred income taxes.................................................................................................................................

17.9



17.1


Total liabilities............................................................................................................................................

1,236.9



1,188.7








Equity:






Capital stock (note 7)............................................................................................................................

2,712.0



2,609.5


Treasury stock (note 7).........................................................................................................................

(12.0)



(21.4)


Contributed surplus...............................................................................................................................

681.7



677.1


Deficit....................................................................................................................................................

(1,965.4)



(1,845.3)


Accumulated other comprehensive loss.................................................................................................

(14.3)



(25.0)


Total equity................................................................................................................................................

1,402.0



1,394.9


Total liabilities and equity..........................................................................................................................

$

2,638.9



$

2,583.6


Contingencies (note 12)

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements.


CELESTICA INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS
(in millions of U.S. dollars, except per share amounts)
(unaudited)


Three months ended


Year ended


December 31


December 31


2013


2014


2013


2014

Revenue...........................................................................................................

$

1,436.7



$

1,424.3



$

5,796.1



$

5,631.3


Cost of sales (note 5)......................................................................................

1,333.1



1,319.8



5,406.6



5,225.9


Gross profit....................................................................................................

103.6



104.5



389.5



405.4


Selling, general and administrative expenses (SG&A).....................................

56.2



52.9



222.3



210.3


Research and development..............................................................................

5.5



5.0



17.4



19.7


Amortization of intangible assets...................................................................

2.8



2.5



12.2



10.6


Other charges (note 9).....................................................................................

17.5



37.4



4.0



37.1


Earnings from operations................................................................................

21.6



6.7



133.6



127.7


Finance costs...................................................................................................

0.8



1.0



2.9



3.1


Earnings before income taxes..........................................................................

20.8



5.7



130.7



124.6


Income tax expense (recovery) (note 10):












Current.........................................................................................................

(0.6)



4.0



16.9



9.7


Deferred........................................................................................................

(0.7)



6.1



(4.2)



6.7



(1.3)



10.1



12.7



16.4


Net earnings (loss) for the period...................................................................

$

22.1



$

(4.4)



$

118.0



$

108.2














Basic earnings (loss) per share........................................................................

$

0.12



$

(0.03)



$

0.64



$

0.61














Diluted earnings (loss) per share.....................................................................

$

0.12



$

(0.03)



$

0.64



$

0.60














Shares used in computing per share amounts (in millions) (note 7):












Basic.............................................................................................................

182.0



175.6



183.4



178.4


Diluted..........................................................................................................

184.5



175.6



185.4



180.4


The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements.


CELESTICA INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS)
(in millions of U.S. dollars)
(unaudited)


Three months ended


Year ended


December 31


December 31


2013


2014


2013


2014

Net earnings (loss) for the period...................................................................

$

22.1



$

(4.4)



$

118.0



$

108.2


Other comprehensive income (loss), net of tax:












Items that will not be reclassified to net earnings (loss):












  Actuarial gains on pension and non-pension post-employment benefit plans (note 8)....

7.6



9.6



7.6



11.9


Items that may be reclassified to net earnings (loss):












  Currency translation differences for foreign operations.............................

(1.0)



(4.6)



(3.3)



(10.0)


  Changes from derivatives designated as hedges..........................................

(6.9)



(7.3)



(15.1)



(0.7)


Total comprehensive income (loss) for the period..........................................

$

21.8



$

(6.7)



$

107.2



$

109.4


The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements.


CELESTICA INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY
(in millions of U.S. dollars)
(unaudited)


Capital stock

(note 7)


Treasury

stock (note 7)


Contributed

surplus


Deficit


Accumulated

other

comprehensive

income (loss)

 (a)


Total equity

Balance -- January 1, 2013...................................

$

2,774.7



$

(18.3)



$

653.2



$

(2,091.0)



$

4.1



$

1,322.7


Capital transactions (note 7):


















Issuance of capital stock..................................

19.9





(12.8)







7.1


Repurchase of capital stock for cancellation...

(82.6)





29.2







(53.4)


Purchase of treasury stock..............................



(12.8)









(12.8)


Stock-based compensation and other..............



19.1



12.1







31.2


Total comprehensive income:


















Net earnings for 2013......................................







118.0





118.0


  Other comprehensive income (loss), net of tax:


















Actuarial gains on pension and non-pension post-employment plans (note 8).............







7.6





7.6


Currency translation differences for foreign operations................................................









(3.3)



(3.3)


Changes from derivatives designated as hedges......................................................









(15.1)



(15.1)


Balance -- December 31, 2013..............................

$

2,712.0



$

(12.0)



$

681.7



$

(1,965.4)



$

(14.3)



$

1,402.0




















Capital transactions (note 7):


















Issuance of capital stock..................................

20.1





(12.3)







7.8


Repurchase of capital stock for cancellation (b)................................................................

(122.6)





(8.2)







(130.8)


Purchase of treasury stock..............................



(23.9)









(23.9)


Stock-based compensation and other..............



14.5



15.9







30.4


Total comprehensive income:


















Net earnings for 2014......................................







108.2





108.2


Other comprehensive income (loss), net of tax:


















Actuarial gains on pension and non-pension post-employment plans (note 8).............







11.9





11.9


Currency translation differences for foreign operations................................................









(10.0)



(10.0)


Changes from derivatives designated as hedges......................................................









(0.7)



(0.7)


Balance -- December 31, 2014..............................

$

2,609.5



$

(21.4)



$

677.1



$

(1,845.3)



$

(25.0)



$

1,394.9


 

(a) 

 Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) is net of tax.



(b)

 Includes $50.0 prepayment under a program share repurchase. See note 7.

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements.


CELESTICA INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS
(in millions of U.S. dollars)
(unaudited)

 


Three months ended


Year ended


December 31


December 31


2013


2014


2013


2014

Cash provided by (used in):












Operating activities:












Net earnings (loss) for the period...................................................................

$

22.1



$

(4.4)



$

118.0



$

108.2


Adjustments to net earnings (loss) for items not affecting cash:












Depreciation and amortization...................................................................

16.9



17.8



71.7



68.7


Equity-settled stock-based compensation.................................................

6.6



5.9



29.2



28.4


Other charges (note 9)................................................................................

1.2



40.8



1.9



47.1


Finance costs..............................................................................................

0.8



1.0



2.9



3.1


Income tax expense (recovery)...................................................................

(1.3)



10.1



12.7



16.4


Other...............................................................................................................

4.1



(2.3)



3.8



(14.7)


Changes in non-cash working capital items:












Accounts receivable....................................................................................

(0.7)



(3.1)



46.4



(39.4)


Inventories..................................................................................................

64.6



56.2



(71.5)



98.2


Other current assets...................................................................................

(0.1)



(23.9)



3.6



(18.9)


Accounts payable, accrued and other current liabilities and provisions....

(72.9)



(15.7)



(47.5)



(31.6)


Non-cash working capital changes..................................................................

(9.1)



13.5



(69.0)



8.3


Net income taxes paid.....................................................................................

(7.2)



(4.4)



(21.8)



(24.0)


Net cash provided by operating activities......................................................

34.1



78.0



149.4



241.5














Investing activities:












Purchase of computer software and property, plant and equipment.............

(11.1)



(16.6)



(52.8)



(61.3)


Proceeds from sale of assets...........................................................................

1.3



0.8



4.2



1.4


Net cash used in investing activities...............................................................

(9.8)



(15.8)



(48.6)



(59.9)














Financing activities:












Repayments under credit facilities (note 6)....................................................





(55.0)




Issuance of capital stock (note 7)...................................................................

1.0



0.4



7.1



7.8


Repurchase of capital stock for cancellation (note 7).....................................

(24.8)



(73.6)



(43.6)



(140.6)


Purchase of treasury stock (note 7)................................................................

(2.4)





(12.8)



(23.9)


Finance costs paid...........................................................................................

(0.6)



(2.2)



(2.7)



(4.2)


Net cash used in financing activities...............................................................

(26.8)



(75.4)



(107.0)



(160.9)














Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents......................................

(2.5)



(13.2)



(6.2)



20.7


Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period..............................................

546.8



578.2



550.5



544.3


Cash and cash equivalents, end of period.......................................................

$

544.3



$

565.0



$

544.3



$

565.0


The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements.



CELESTICA INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(in millions of U.S. dollars, except percentages and per share amounts)
(unaudited)

 

1. REPORTING ENTITY

Celestica Inc. (Celestica) is incorporated in Canada with its corporate headquarters located at 844 Don Mills Road, Toronto, Ontario, M3C 1V7.  Celestica's subordinate voting shares are listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange (TSX) and the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE).

Celestica delivers innovative supply chain solutions globally to customers in the Communications (comprised of enterprise communications and telecommunications), Consumer, Diversified (comprised of industrial, aerospace and defense, healthcare, solar, green technology, semiconductor equipment and other), Servers, and Storage end markets. Our product lifecycle offerings include a range of services to our customers including design, engineering services, supply chain management, new product introduction, component sourcing, electronics manufacturing, assembly and test, complex mechanical assembly, systems integration, precision machining, order fulfillment, logistics and after-market repair and return services.


2. BASIS OF PREPARATION AND SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

Statement of compliance:

These unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with International Accounting Standard (IAS) 34, Interim Financial Reporting, as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) and the accounting policies we have adopted in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS). These unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements reflect all adjustments that are, in the opinion of management, necessary to present fairly our financial position as at December 31, 2014 and our financial performance, comprehensive income and cash flows for the three months and the year ended December 31, 2014.

The unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements were authorized for issuance by our board of directors on January 20, 2015.

Functional and presentation currency:

These unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements are presented in U.S. dollars, which is also our functional currency. Unless otherwise noted, all financial information is presented in millions of U.S. dollars (except percentages and per share amounts).

Use of estimates and judgments:

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with IFRS requires management to make judgments, estimates and assumptions that affect the application of accounting policies and the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, revenue and expenses, and the related disclosures of contingent assets and liabilities. Actual results could differ materially from these estimates and assumptions. We review our estimates and underlying assumptions on an ongoing basis and make revisions as determined necessary by management. Revisions are recognized in the period in which the estimates are revised and may impact future periods as well.

Key sources of estimation uncertainty and judgment: We have applied significant estimates and assumptions in the following areas which we believe could have a significant impact on our reported results and financial position: our valuations of inventory, assets held for sale and income taxes; the amount of our restructuring charges or recoveries; the measurement of the recoverable amount of our cash generating units (CGUs), which we define as a group of assets that cannot be tested individually and that generates cash inflows that are largely independent of the cash inflows from other assets or groups of assets; our valuations of financial assets and liabilities, pension and non-pension post-employment benefit costs, employee stock-based compensation expense, provisions and contingencies; and the allocation of the purchase price and other valuations related to our business acquisitions.

We have also applied significant judgment in the following areas: the determination of our CGUs and whether events or changes in circumstances during the period are indicators that a review for impairment should be conducted, and the timing of the recognition of charges or recoveries associated with our restructuring actions.

These unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements are based upon accounting policies and estimates consistent with those used and described in note 2 of our 2013 annual audited consolidated financial statements, except for the recently adopted accounting pronouncements discussed below. There have been no material changes to our significant accounting estimates and assumptions or the judgments affecting the application of such estimates and assumptions during 2014 from those described in the notes to our 2013 annual audited consolidated financial statements, except for the changes we made to the estimates and assumptions used to determine our warranty provisions. As a result of a review conducted in the third quarter of 2014, based primarily on historical experience, we recorded a net credit of $2.5 in cost of sales for the third quarter of 2014. The near-term economic environment could also impact certain estimates necessary to prepare our consolidated financial statements, in particular, the estimates related to the recoverable amount used in our impairment testing of our non-financial assets (see note 9(b)), and the discount rates applied to our net pension and non-pension post-employment benefit assets or liabilities (see note 8).

Recently adopted accounting pronouncements:

Effective January 1, 2014, we adopted IAS 32, Financial Instruments — Presentation (revised) as issued by the IASB, which clarifies the requirements for offsetting financial assets and liabilities. The adoption of this amendment did not have a material impact on our unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements.

Effective January 1, 2014, we adopted IFRIC Interpretation 21, Levies as issued by the IASB, which clarifies when the liability for certain levies should be recognized and requires retroactive adoption. The adoption of this interpretation did not have a material impact on our unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements.

Recently issued accounting pronouncements:

In May 2014, the IASB issued IFRS 15, Revenue from Contracts with Customers, which provides a single, principles-based five-step model for revenue recognition to be applied to all customer contracts, and requires enhanced disclosures. This standard is effective January 1, 2017 and allows early adoption.  We do not intend to adopt this standard early and are currently evaluating the anticipated impact of adopting this standard on our consolidated financial statements.

In July 2014, the IASB issued a final version of IFRS 9, Financial Instruments, which replaces IAS 39, Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement, and is effective for annual periods beginning on or after January 1, 2018, with earlier adoption permitted. The standard introduces a new model for the classification and measurement of financial assets, a single expected credit loss model for the measurement of the impairment of financial assets, and a new model for hedge accounting that is aligned with a company's risk management activities. We do not intend to adopt this standard early and are currently evaluating the anticipated impact of adopting this standard on our consolidated financial statements.


3. SEGMENT AND CUSTOMER REPORTING

End markets:

The following table indicates revenue by end market as a percentage of total revenue for the periods indicated. Our revenue fluctuates from period-to-period depending on numerous factors, including but not limited to: the mix and complexity of the products or services we provide, the extent, timing and rate of new program wins, follow-on business or program losses, the phasing in or out of programs, the seasonality of our business, the success in the marketplace of our customers' products, and changes in customer demand. We expect that the pace of technological change, the frequency of customers transferring business among EMS competitors, the level of outsourcing by customers (including decisions to insource), and the dynamics of the global economy will also continue to impact our business from period-to-period.


Three months ended

December 31


Year ended

December 31


2013


2014


2013


2014

Communications...................................................................................................

41%



40%


42%



40%

Consumer..............................................................................................................

6%



3%


6%



5%

Diversified.............................................................................................................

27%



27%


25%



28%

Servers...................................................................................................................

11%



10%


13%



9%

Storage...................................................................................................................

15%



20%


14%



18%

Customers:

For the fourth quarter and full year 2014, we had three customers that individually represented more than 10% of total revenue (fourth quarter and full year 2013 — three customers and two customers, respectively).

4. ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE

In November 2012, we renewed and amended our accounts receivable sales agreement to sell up to $375.0 at any one time in accounts receivable on an uncommitted basis (subject to pre-determined limits by customer) to two third-party banks. This agreement is renewable annually by mutual consent and can be terminated at any time by the banks or by us. In November 2013, we renewed and amended the agreement to reduce its overall capacity to $250.0 based upon our annual review of our requirements under this agreement. In November 2014, we renewed and amended this agreement at the same capacity and added a third bank. Each of these banks had a Standard and Poor's long-term rating of A or above and short-term rating of A-1 at December 31, 2014. At December 31, 2014, we had sold $50.0 of accounts receivable under this facility (December 31, 2013 — $50.0). The accounts receivable sold are removed from our consolidated balance sheet and reflected as cash provided by operating activities in our consolidated statement of cash flows. Upon sale, we assign the rights to the accounts receivable to the banks. We continue to collect cash from our customers and remit the cash to the banks when collected. We pay interest and fees which we record in finance costs in our consolidated statement of operations.

5. INVENTORIES

We record our inventory provisions and valuation recoveries in cost of sales. We record inventory provisions to reflect write-downs in the value of our inventory to net realizable value, and valuation recoveries primarily to reflect realized gains on the disposition of inventory previously written down to net realizable value. We recorded net inventory provisions of $0.3 and $5.8 for the fourth quarter and full year 2014, respectively (fourth quarter of 2013 — net inventory recoveries of $0.3; full year 2013 — net inventory provisions of $7.9). We regularly review our estimates and assumptions used to value our inventory through analysis of historical performance.


6. CREDIT FACILITIES

Our $400.0 revolving credit facility was scheduled to mature in January 2015. This facility included an accordion feature that would have allowed us to increase the credit limit under this facility by an additional $50.0 upon satisfaction of certain terms and conditions. In October 2014, we amended this facility under generally similar terms and conditions, extending its maturity to October 2018. Based on a review of our overall requirements, the credit limit of the amended facility was reduced to $300.0, with an accordion feature that allows us to increase this limit by an additional $150.0 upon satisfaction of certain terms and conditions. The facility includes a $25.0 swing line, subject to the overall credit limit, that provides for short-term borrowings up to a maximum of seven days. Borrowings under this facility bear interest for the period of the draw at LIBOR, Prime or Federal Funds rate plus a margin. The credit facility permits us and certain designated subsidiaries to borrow funds for general corporate purposes (including acquisitions). We are required to comply with certain restrictive covenants in respect of the facility, including those relating to the incurrence of senior ranking indebtedness, the sale of assets, a change of control, and certain financial covenants related to indebtedness and interest coverage. Certain of our assets are pledged as security for borrowings under this facility.

Borrowings under our revolving credit facility have historically been outstanding for fewer than 90 days. In December 2012, we completed a substantial issuer bid to repurchase for cancellation $175.0 of our subordinate voting shares, $55.0 of which were funded through this facility, which we repaid in the first half of 2013. At December 31, 2014, there were no amounts outstanding under this facility (December 31, 2013 — no amounts outstanding), and we were in compliance with all applicable restrictive and financial covenants required by this facility. Commitment fees paid in the fourth quarter and full year 2014 were $0.5 and $2.0, respectively (fourth quarter and full year 2013 — $0.5 and $2.0, respectively). At December 31, 2014, we had $30.1 (December 31, 2013 — $29.7) outstanding in letters of credit under this facility. 

We also have a total of $70.0 of uncommitted bank overdraft facilities available for intraday and overnight operating requirements. There were no amounts outstanding under these overdraft facilities at December 31, 2014 or December 31, 2013.

The amounts we borrow and repay under these facilities can vary significantly from month-to-month depending upon our working capital and other cash requirements.


7. CAPITAL STOCK

We have repurchased subordinate voting shares in the open market for cancellation in recent years pursuant to normal course issuer bids (NCIBs), which allow us to repurchase a limited number of subordinate voting shares during a specified period, and a substantial issuer bid (SIB). As part of the NCIB process, we have entered into Automatic Share Purchase Plans (ASPPs) with brokers, that allow such brokers to purchase our subordinate voting shares in the open market on our behalf for cancellation under our NCIBs (including during any applicable trading blackout periods). In addition, we have entered into program share repurchases (PSRs) as part of the NCIB process, pursuant to which we make a prepayment to a broker in consideration for the right to receive a variable number of subordinate voting shares upon such PSR's completion. Under such PSRs, the price and number of subordinate voting shares to be repurchased by us is determined based on a discount to the volume weighted-average market price of our subordinate voting shares during the term of the PSR, subject to certain terms and conditions. The subordinate voting shares repurchased under any PSR are cancelled upon completion of each PSR under the NCIB.

In August 2014, we completed an NCIB launched in August 2013 (the 2013 NCIB), which allowed us to repurchase, at our discretion, up to approximately 9.8 million subordinate voting shares in the open market, or as otherwise permitted. During 2014, we paid $59.6 (including transaction fees) to repurchase and cancel an aggregate of 5.5 million subordinate voting shares at a weighted average price of $10.82 per share under the 2013 NCIB, including 4.0 million subordinate voting shares repurchased pursuant to two PSRs and 0.9 million subordinate voting shares repurchased pursuant to an ASPP completed during the term of the 2013 NCIB. The maximum number of subordinate voting shares we were permitted to repurchase for cancellation under the 2013 NCIB was reduced by 0.3 million subordinate voting shares we purchased in the open market during its term to satisfy obligations under our stock-based compensation plans.

On September 9, 2014, the TSX accepted our notice to launch a new NCIB (the 2014 NCIB), which allows us to repurchase, at our discretion, until the earlier of September 10, 2015 or the completion of purchases thereunder, up to approximately 10.3 million subordinate voting shares (representing approximately 5.8% of our total outstanding subordinate voting and multiple voting shares at the time of launch) in the open market or as otherwise permitted, subject to the normal terms and limitations of such bids. During 2014, we paid $31.0 (including transaction fees) to repurchase and cancel 2.9 million subordinate voting shares under the 2014 NCIB at a weighted average price of $10.53 per share. In December 2014, the TSX accepted our notice to amend the 2014 NCIB to permit the repurchase of our subordinate voting shares thereunder through one or more PSRs. In connection therewith, we paid $50.0 to a broker in December 2014 under a PSR for the right to receive a variable number of our subordinate voting shares upon such PSR's completion, which is expected by mid-March 2015.

During 2013, we paid $43.6 (including transaction fees) to repurchase and cancel 4.1 million subordinate voting shares under the 2013 NCIB, at a weighted average price of $10.70 per share. At December 31, 2013, we recorded a liability of $9.8, representing the estimated cash required to repurchase the remaining 0.9 million subordinate voting shares available for purchase under the ASPP described above.

We grant share unit awards to employees under our stock-based compensation plans. We have the option to satisfy the delivery of shares upon vesting of the awards by purchasing subordinate voting shares in the open market or by settling such awards in cash. Under one of these plans, we also have the option to satisfy the delivery of shares by issuing new subordinate voting shares from treasury, subject to certain limits. From time-to-time, we pay cash for the purchase by a trustee of subordinate voting shares in the open market to satisfy the delivery of shares upon vesting of awards. For accounting purposes, we classify these shares as treasury stock until they are delivered pursuant to the plans. During the fourth quarter of 2014, we did not purchase any subordinate voting shares in the open market to satisfy the delivery requirements under our stock-based compensation plans. During the first nine months of 2014, we paid $23.9 (including transaction fees) for the trustee's purchase of 2.2 million subordinate voting shares in the open market (outside of any NCIB period) for such purpose. During the fourth quarter and full year 2013, we paid $2.4 and $12.8 (including transaction fees), respectively, for the trustee's purchase in the open market of 0.2 million and 1.3 million subordinate voting shares, respectively, for such purpose. At December 31, 2014, the trustee held 2.0 million subordinate voting shares with a value of $21.4 (December 31, 2013 — 1.3 million subordinate voting shares with a value of $12.0).

The following table outlines the activities for stock-based awards granted to employees (activities for deferred share units (DSUs) issued to directors are excluded) for the year ended December 31, 2014:

Number of awards (in millions)


Options


RSUs


PSUs (i)











Outstanding at December 31, 2013...............................................................................................


5.3



3.5



5.4


Granted (i)........................................................................................................................................




2.1



2.6


Exercised or settled (ii)...................................................................................................................


(1.1)



(2.0)



(0.5)


Forfeited/expired.............................................................................................................................


(0.9)



(0.2)



(1.4)


Outstanding at December 31, 2014...............................................................................................


3.3



3.4



6.1












Weighted-average grant date fair value of options and share units granted........................


$



$

9.33



$

9.30















 

(i)           

During 2014, we granted 2.6 million (2013 — 2.1 million) performance share units (PSUs), of which 60% vest based on the achievement of a market performance condition tied to Total Shareholder Return (TSR), and the balance vest based on a non-market performance condition based on pre-determined financial targets. See note 2(n) of our 2013 annual audited consolidated financial statements for a description of TSR. We estimated the grant date fair value of the TSR-based PSUs using a Monte Carlo simulation model. The grant date fair value of the non-TSR-based PSUs is determined by the market value of our subordinate voting shares at the time of grant and may be adjusted in subsequent periods to reflect a change in the estimated level of achievement related to the applicable performance condition. We expect to settle these awards with subordinate voting shares purchased in the open market by a trustee or issued from treasury. The number of PSUs that will actually vest will vary from 0 to the amount set forth in the table above as outstanding at December 31, 2014 (representing the maximum potential payout) depending on the level of achievement of the relevant performance conditions.



(ii)          

During the fourth quarter and full year 2014, we received cash proceeds of $0.4 and $7.8, respectively (fourth quarter and full year 2013 — $1.0 and $7.1, respectively) relating to the exercise of stock options granted to employees.

At December 31, 2014, 1.1 million (December 31, 2013 — 1.0 million) DSUs were outstanding.

For the fourth quarter and full year 2014, we recorded employee stock-based compensation expense (excluding DSUs) of $5.9 and $28.4, respectively (fourth quarter and full year 2013 — $6.6 and $29.2, respectively), and DSU expense of $0.5 and $1.9, respectively (fourth quarter and full year 2013 — $0.6 and $1.9, respectively). The amount of our employee stock-based compensation expense varies from period-to-period. The portion of our expense that relates to performance-based compensation generally varies depending on the level of achievement of pre-determined performance goals and financial targets.

Weighted average number of shares outstanding:

The weighted average number of shares used for the diluted per share calculations include the effect of stock-based compensation awards, if dilutive. For the fourth quarter of 2014, we excluded the effect of 2.0 million such awards as they were anti-dilutive due to the loss reported in the period.

8. PENSION AND NON-PENSION POST-EMPLOYMENT BENEFIT PLANS

We provide pension and non-pension post-employment defined benefit plans for our employees. Our obligations are determined based on actuarial valuations. We recognize actuarial gains or losses arising from pension and non-pension post-employment defined benefit plans in other comprehensive income and we subsequently reclassify the amounts to deficit. For 2014, we recognized $11.9 of net actuarial gains, net of tax (2013 — $7.6 of net actuarial gains, net of tax). We used a measurement date of December 31, 2014 for the accounting valuation of our pension and non-pension post-employment defined benefit plans.

Also see note 9(c).


9. OTHER CHARGES


Three months ended December 31


Year ended December 31


2013


2014


2013


2014

Restructuring (a)................................................................................

$

17.5



$

(2.1)



$

28.0



$

(2.1)


Asset impairment (b).........................................................................



40.8





40.8


Pension obligation settlement loss (c)...........................................







6.4


Other (d)..............................................................................................



(1.3)



(24.0)



(8.0)



$

17.5



$

37.4



$

4.0



$

37.1


(a) Restructuring:

Our restructuring charges (recoveries) are comprised of the following:


Three months ended December 31


Year ended December 31


2013


2014


2013


2014

Cash charges (recoveries)................................................................

$

16.3



$

(2.1)



$

26.1



$

(2.0)


Non-cash charges (recoveries).......................................................

1.2





1.9



(0.1)



$

17.5



$

(2.1)



$

28.0



$

(2.1)


Due to our disengagement from BlackBerry Limited in 2012 and in response to a challenging demand environment, we implemented restructuring actions during 2013 throughout our global network intended to streamline and simplify our business and to reduce our overall cost structure and improve margin performance. In connection with these actions, we recorded restructuring charges of $28.0 in 2013, including $17.5 recorded in the fourth quarter of 2013. Although the restructuring actions were completed by the end of 2013, certain payments in connection therewith were made throughout 2014. At December 31, 2014, our remaining restructuring provision was $1.9 (December 31, 2013$18.0) comprised primarily of contractual lease obligations for a facility that we intend to close. In 2014, we recorded a net reversal of $2.1 primarily to adjust for lower than estimated payouts related to this facility.

The recognition of our restructuring charges required us to make certain judgments and estimates regarding the nature, timing and amounts associated with these restructuring actions. Our major assumptions included the timing and number of employees to be terminated, the measurement of termination costs, the timing and amount of lease obligations, and the timing of disposition and estimated fair values of assets available for sale. We developed a detailed plan and recorded termination costs for employees informed of their termination. We engaged independent brokers to determine the estimated fair values less costs to sell for assets we no longer used and which were available for sale. We recognized an impairment loss for assets whose carrying amount exceeded their respective fair value less costs to sell as determined by the third-party brokers. We also recorded adjustments to reflect actual proceeds on disposition of these assets. At the end of each reporting period, we evaluate the appropriateness of our restructuring charges and balances. Further adjustments may be required to reflect actual experience or changes in estimates.


(b) Annual impairment assessment:

We conduct our annual impairment assessment of goodwill, intangible assets and property, plant and equipment in the fourth quarter of each year and whenever events or changes in circumstance indicate that the carrying amount of an asset, CGU or a group of CGUs may not be recoverable. We recognize an impairment loss when the carrying amount of an asset, CGU or a group of CGUs exceeds its recoverable amount, which is measured as the greater of its value-in-use and its fair value less costs to sell. We first allocate impairment losses in respect of a CGU to reduce the carrying amount of goodwill and then to reduce the carrying amount of other assets in the CGU or group of CGUs on a pro rata basis. Prior to our 2014 annual impairment assessment, we did not identify any triggering event during the course of 2014 that would indicate the carrying amount of our assets and CGUs may not be recoverable.

Upon completion of our 2014 annual impairment assessment of goodwill, intangible assets and property, plant and equipment, we determined that the recoverable amount of our assets and CGUs, other than that of our semiconductor CGU, exceeded their respective carrying values and no impairment exists for such assets and CGUs as of December 31, 2014. Our semiconductor CGU, which arose from our 2011 acquisition of the semiconductor equipment contract manufacturing operations of Brooks Automation Inc. and our 2012 acquisition of D&H Manufacturing Company, has underperformed due to factors including: overall demand weakness in the semiconductor industry in recent years, the cost of investments we have made, operational challenges, and the cost, terms and timing of ramping new programs. In addition, in 2014, this CGU incurred higher than expected losses, primarily due to lower than anticipated customer demand for the year as well as operational inefficiencies and commercial challenges associated with the ramping of new facilities and new programs for a particular customer. We continue to work with this customer to resolve these issues. Primarily as a result of management's assessment of the negative impact of these factors on the timing and level of previously assumed future revenue growth of, and profitability improvements to, this CGU, we reduced our long-term cash flow projections of this CGU in the fourth quarter of 2014 and recorded an impairment charge of $40.8 against the goodwill of our semiconductor CGU in such period, reducing its balance from $60.3 to $19.5.

We determined the recoverable amount of our CGUs based on their expected value-in-use. The process of determining the recoverable amount of a CGU is subjective and requires management to exercise significant judgment in estimating future growth, profitability, and discount rates, among other factors. The assumptions used in our impairment assessment were determined based on past experiences adjusted for expected changes in future conditions. Our major assumptions included projections of cash flows, which are based primarily on our plan for the following year and, to a lesser extent, on our three-year strategic plan and other updates. The plan for the following year and the three-year strategic plan were both approved by management and presented to our Board of Directors. Where applicable, we worked with independent brokers to obtain market prices to estimate our real property values. For our 2014 annual impairment assessment, we used cash flow projections ranging from 2 years to approximately 9 years (2013 — 3 to 10 years; 2012 — 2 to 7 years) for our CGUs, in line with the remaining useful lives of the CGUs' primary assets. We generally used our weighted-average cost of capital of approximately 10% (2013 — approximately 12%; 2012 — approximately 13%), on a pre-tax basis, to discount our cash flows. For our semiconductor CGU, which is subject to heightened risk and volatilities (as a result of the factors discussed above), we applied a discount rate of 17% to our cash flow projections for this CGU (2013 — 17%; 2012 — 20%) to reflect management's assessment of increased risk inherent in these cash flows. We had reduced the discount rate for our semiconductor cash flow projections for 2013 to 17% compared to 20% for 2012 to reflect a perceived reduction in risk inherent in our semiconductor cash flows as a result of new business awarded in 2013. Despite the 2% decrease in the company's overall weighted-average cost of capital in 2014 compared to 2013, and new business awarded to this CGU in 2014, we maintained its 17% discount rate for our 2014 annual analysis in recognition of the challenges faced by this CGU.

As noted above, despite the challenges facing our semiconductor CGU, we continued to develop new business opportunities with our semiconductor customers in 2014. As a result, for purposes of our 2014 impairment assessment, we assumed growth for this CGU in 2015 and future years at an average compound annual growth rate of 10% over a 9-year period, representing the remaining life of the CGU's most significant customer contract. The growth rate is supported by new business awarded in 2014 and 2013, the expectation of future new business awards, and the anticipated overall demand improvement in the semiconductor end market based on certain market trend analyses published by external sources. We have also assumed that the average annual margins for this CGU over the projection period are slightly lower than the company's overall margin performance achieved in 2014, as we continue to ramp new business and leverage our capital investments.

Impairment assessments inherently involve judgment as to assumptions about expected future cash flows and the impact of market conditions on those assumptions. Future events and changing market conditions may impact our assumptions as to prices, costs or other factors that may result in changes in our estimates of future cash flows. Failure to realize the assumed revenues at an appropriate profit margin or failure to improve the financial results of this CGU could result in additional impairment loss in this CGU in a future period.

As part of our annual impairment assessment, we perform sensitivity analyses to identify the impact of changes in key assumptions, including projected growth rates, profitability, and discount rates. We did not identify any key assumptions where a reasonably possible change would result in material impairments to our other CGUs.

In 2013, we recorded no impairment against goodwill, intangible assets or property, plant and equipment as the recoverable amounts of our CGUs exceeded their carrying amounts.

(c) Pension obligation settlement loss:

In August 2014, we liquidated the asset portfolio for the defined benefit component of a pension plan for certain Canadian employees, following which substantially all of the proceeds were used to purchase annuities from insurance companies for those participants. The purchase of the annuities resulted in the insurance companies assuming responsibility for payment of the defined benefit pension benefits under the plan, and the employer eliminating significant financial risk in respect of these obligations. We re-measured the pension assets and liabilities immediately before the purchase of the annuities, and recorded a net re-measurement actuarial gain of $2.3 in other comprehensive income that was subsequently reclassified to deficit. The purchase of the annuities also resulted in a non-cash settlement loss of $6.4 which we recorded in other charges on our consolidated statement of operations. For accounting purposes, on a gross-basis, we reduced the value of our pension assets by $149.8, and the value of our pension liabilities by $143.4 as of the date of the annuity purchase.

(d) Other:

In 2014, other was comprised primarily of the recoveries of damages we received in connection with the settlement of class action lawsuits in which we were a plaintiff, related to certain purchases we made in prior periods. In July 2013, we received similar recoveries of damages in the amount of $24.0.


10. INCOME TAXES

Our effective income tax rate can vary significantly quarter-to-quarter for various reasons, including the mix and volume of business in lower tax jurisdictions within Europe and Asia, in jurisdictions with tax holidays and tax incentives, and in jurisdictions for which no deferred income tax assets have been recognized because management believed it was not probable that future taxable profit would be available against which tax losses and deductible temporary differences could be utilized.  Our effective income tax rate can also vary due to the impact of restructuring charges, foreign exchange fluctuations, operating losses, and changes in our provisions related to tax uncertainties.

During the first quarter of 2014, Malaysian investment authorities approved our request to revise certain required conditions related to income tax incentives for one of our Malaysian subsidiaries. The benefits of these tax incentives were not previously recognized, as prior to this revision we had not anticipated meeting the required conditions. As a result of this approval, we recognized an income tax benefit of $14.1 in the first quarter of 2014 relating to years 2010 through 2013. There was no tax impact associated with the $40.8 non-cash goodwill impairment charge we recorded in the fourth quarter of 2014. See note 9 (b).

During the fourth quarter of 2013, we recorded net income tax recoveries of $8.0 arising from net changes to our provisions for certain tax uncertainties.

See note 12 regarding income tax contingencies.


11. FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS AND RISK MANAGEMENT

Our financial assets are comprised primarily of cash and cash equivalents, accounts receivable and derivatives used for hedging purposes. Our financial liabilities are comprised primarily of accounts payable, certain accrued and other liabilities and provisions, and derivatives. We record the majority of our financial liabilities at amortized cost except for derivative liabilities, which we measure at fair value. We classify our term deposits as held-to-maturity. We record our short-term investments in money market funds at fair value, with changes recognized in our consolidated statement of operations.

We classify the financial assets and liabilities that we measure at fair value based on the inputs used to determine fair value at the measurement date. See note 20 of our 2013 annual audited consolidated financial statements for details of the input levels used and our fair value hierarchy at December 31, 2013. There have been no significant changes to the source of our inputs since December 31, 2013.

Cash and cash equivalents are comprised of the following:


December 31
 2013


December 31
 2014

Cash.......................................................................................................................................................

$

294.3



$

397.2


Cash equivalents.................................................................................................................................

250.0



167.8



$

544.3



$

565.0


Our current portfolio consists of bank deposits and certain money market funds that primarily hold U.S. government securities. The majority of our cash and cash equivalents is held with financial institutions each of which had at December 31, 2014 a Standard and Poor's short-term rating of A-1 or above.

Currency risk:

Due to the global nature of our operations, we are exposed to exchange rate fluctuations on our financial instruments denominated in various currencies. The majority of our currency risk is driven by the operational costs incurred in local currencies by our subsidiaries. We manage our currency risk through our hedging program using forecasts of future cash flows and balance sheet exposures denominated in foreign currencies.

Our major currency exposures at December 31, 2014 are summarized in U.S. dollar equivalents in the following table. We have included in this table only those items that we classify as financial assets or liabilities and which were denominated in non-functional currencies. In accordance with the IFRS financial instruments standard, we have excluded items such as pension and non-pension post-employment benefits and income taxes. The local currency amounts have been converted to U.S. dollar equivalents using the spot rates at December 31, 2014.


Canadian dollar


Euro


Malaysian
 ringgit


Thai
 baht

Cash and cash equivalents..................................................................................

$

10.6



$

3.2



$

2.1



$

0.3


Account receivable and other financial assets................................................

0.1



19.7



0.4



0.2


Accounts payable and certain accrued and other liabilities and provisions.............

(46.7)



(7.3)



(15.7)



(17.9)


Net financial assets (liabilities)...........................................................................

$

(36.0)



$

15.6



$

(13.2)



$

(17.4)


Foreign currency risk sensitivity analysis:

The financial impact of a one-percentage point strengthening or weakening of the following currencies against the U.S. dollar for our financial instruments denominated in non-functional currencies is summarized in the following table as at December 31, 2014. The financial instruments impacted by a change in exchange rates include our exposures to the above financial assets or liabilities denominated in non-functional currencies and our foreign exchange forward contracts.


Canadian dollar


Euro


Malaysian
 ringgit


Thai
 baht


Increase (decrease)

1% Strengthening












Net earnings...................................................................................................

$

0.5



$

(0.1)



$

(0.1)



$

(0.1)


Other comprehensive income......................................................................

1.0





0.8



1.1


1% Weakening












Net earnings...................................................................................................

(0.5)



0.1



0.1



0.1


Other comprehensive income......................................................................

(1.0)





(0.8)



(1.1)


















At December 31, 2014, we had forward exchange contracts to trade U.S. dollars in exchange for the following currencies:

Currency

Amount of

U.S. dollars


Weighted average

exchange rate in

U.S. dollars


Maximum

period in

months


Fair value

gain (loss)

Canadian dollar.................................................................................

$

293.3



$

0.88



14


$

(6.7)


Thai baht...........................................................................................

129.5



0.03



15


(1.1)


Malaysian ringgit.............................................................................